Herb, Ma Huang, Ephedra sinica

Herb, Ma Huang, Ephedra sinica

Ma Huang Ephedra sinica

(Chinese ephedra; Cao ma huang) A long time holy grail, we are very pleased finally to be able to offer seeds of the true Ma huang from Inner Mongolia. Ma huang is a powerful stimulant herb containing the alkaloid ephedrine, the main inspiration for today’s popular over-the-counter antihistamine drugs. Purified ephedrine is very potent, and a common North American practice of adding it to diet formulas is potentially dangerous because ephedrine can raise blood pressure if used over a long period, and can even cause cardiac arrythmias. However, when used in its native, non-purified form, the dried herb is much safer and very popular in traditional Chinese medicine for dispersing conditions characterized by wind and cold, such as chills, fever, headache, cough and wheezing. Very hardy; prefers dry, well-drained location with full sun exposure. Ht. 30cm/12in

Many people choose herbal treatments over prescription drugs because they believe herbs are safer than medications. Often herbs do have little to no side effects and are easier on your body. However, herbal remedies are powerful because they contain active compounds that affect your health.


  1. Ma Huang– A Dangerous Herb That Can Cause Memory Loss

    • While herbal treatments usually make you healthier, sometimes they can make you sick. One herb that can make you sick is ma huang. Ma huang is a dangerous herb that can make you sick and cause memory loss. Always educate yourself before you begin an herbal treatment and seriously consider consulting with your doctor.

    The Law and Ma Huang

    • Ma Huang Ephedra sinica, also known as herbal ecstasy, is a dangerous herb that can cause memory loss in humans. You may have heard of ma huang when Ephedra was legal in every state and a hot topic on the news. The United States keeps going back and forth on the legalization of supplements that contain it. In 2004 the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prohibited the sale of supplements that contain ma huang. Then in 2005, the FDA changed its mind and made it legal. This did not last long as four months after the relegalization of ma huang is was prohibited again.

      Ma Huang and Ephedra

      • Ma huang and ephedra are one and the same. The scientific name for ma huang is ephedra sinica. It is a shrub like plant that bears cones and grows to be over 30 cm tall. This species is native to China, as its name suggests, and thrives in sandy and rocky soils. There are also other species of ephedra other than ma huang. The stem is the portion of this herb that is used as an herbal remedy, while the extracted substance ephedrine is used in over-the-counter stimulants and diet pills. You can make a tea with ma huang or take it in capsules.

      Ma Huang and Diet Pills

      • Ma Huang Ephedra sinica is one of the plants that belong to the genus Ephedra. It is often sold as an active ingredient in diet pills along with caffeine, although it is safer to ingest it without caffeine. Ma huang does not actually cause weight loss but claims to assist overweight individuals with their weight loss goals because it is a stimulant and gives the user more energy than they would naturally have. These weight loss supplements are advertised as natural but that in no way makes them safe. Ma huang has adverse side effects, including elevated heart rates and blood pressure, psychosis and memory loss. It can also react negatively with other herbs or prescription drugs.

      Adverse Effects

      • Ma Huang Ephedra sinica has adverse side effects including elevated heart rates and blood pressure, psychosis and memory loss. It has been known to cause heart attacks in young and otherwise healthy people, including athletes. It can also react negatively with other herbs or prescription drugs.

      Medicinal plants or seeds are offered as a convenience for professional herbalists and those customers who have the experience and knowledge necessary to safely prepare their own formulas.

      We at Valley Seed DO NOT and WILL NOT include or suggest dosage information, as the use of these herbs are intended for professional herbalists and those customers who have the experience and knowledge necessary to safely prepare their own formulas.

      Information on the traditional uses and properties of herbs are provided on this site is for educational use only, and is not intended as medical advice. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Many traditional uses and properties of herbs have not been validated by the FDA. If you have any serious health concerns, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

      In ordering any medicinal herb plants or seeds, I/we as the customer assume any and all responsibility for their use.

      Pack. App 20 seeds. $4.00

      Postage 3.75

      THERE ARE CURRENTLY NO RESTRICTIONS AGAINST EPHEDRA SEEDS IN THE US.

      HOWEVER, THE PAYPAL POLICE HAVE DECIDED, AFTER ALMOST 10 YEARS OF SELLING THIS SEED THROUGH THEM, IT IS IN VIOLATION OF THEIR GUIDELINES. 

      IN ORDER FOR YOU TO ORDER SEEDS YOU NEED, PLEASE FILL OUT THE FORM BELOW.

      USE THE MESSAGE AREA FOR YOUR ORDER AND I’LL TAKE IT FROM THERE.

      THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE.

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      IMPORTANT PLANTING INSTRUCTIONS:

      Seeds are dormant and do not germinate readily. Need light to germinate.

      In Autumn, sow in a light weight sterilized soil mix. Do NOT cover, press firmly and water. Place containers in garden digging them part way into soil. Cover with loose mulch.

      Inspect monthly and remove mulch with germination begins. When large enough to handle, transplant seedlings.

      DORMANT SEEDS OFTEN FAIL TO GERMINATE THE FIRST YEAR and will require a second winter to overcome dormancy.

      INDOORS: Place seeded flat in fridge for 1-12 months or until germination begins.

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