Chinese Motherwort

Chinese Motherwort

Chinese Motherwort. Yi mu cao.

Leonurus japonicus

Yi mu cao

One of the 50 fundamental herbs in Chinese medicine. Chinese Motherwort Yi mu cao as its name suggests it is an invaluable aid to mothers, helping to regulate menstruation, ease post-partum pain and bleeding, and to help to eject the placenta. It is used as an emmenagogue (increases milk flow) and helps to relieve PMS. It is also considered the number one herb in Chinese medicine for the treatment of infertility. A tall annual or biennial, easy to grow from seeds.

Hardy in zones 4-8

Plant in early spring after last frost.

Motherwort is a natural herb native to Europe and Asia and the Americas, most commonly found along riverbanks and loose soil. For hundreds of years, motherwort has been used in folklore and in alternative medicine remedies for generations. Today, you can grow motherwort in your garden or purchase it in liquid, tablet or capsule form from your local health food store.

Packet. app. 25-30 seeds

$4.00




Channels: HT, LIV, BL, PER
Properties:
Spicy, Bitter, Slightly Cold
Latin: Herba Leonuri Heterophylli
Chinese: 益母草
Tone Marks: yì mŭ căo
Translation: Benefit Mother Herb

Chinese Herb Actions

  • Invigorates Blood, Dispels Blood Stasis, Reduces Masses
    A very important herb for gynecological disorders due to blood stagnation. It regulated blood in the chong and treats irregular menses, amenorrhea, postpartum abdominal pain, heavy menses with clots, fixed abdominal masses, infertility and traumatic pain.
  • Promotes Urination, Reduces Swelling and Edema
    For acute systemic edema especially if blood in the urine. Treats dysuria, scanty urine, chronic edema, heavy sensation in the back and legs, abdominal distension, fullness after meals, sallow complexion, fatigue, listlessness and difficulty moving. For edema associated with chronic nephritis. Also for kidney stones.
  • Clears Heat and Toxin
    For dermatological disorders including eczema, sores, lesions, ulcers, itchy rashes, and toxic swellings
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